Upcoming Events – Humanities Washington https://www.humanities.org/events/ Thu, 01 Dec 2022 02:01:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.1.1 IN PERSON: The River That Made Seattle https://www.humanities.org/event/in-person-the-river-that-made-seattle-5/ Sat, 03 Dec 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://www.humanities.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=36450 Once teeming with bountiful salmon and fertile plains, Seattle’s Duwamish River drew both Native peoples and settlers to its shores over centuries for trading, transport, and sustenance. Unfortunately, the very […]

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Once teeming with bountiful salmon and fertile plains, Seattle’s Duwamish River drew both Native peoples and settlers to its shores over centuries for trading, transport, and sustenance. Unfortunately, the very utility of the river was its undoing, as decades of dumping led to the river being declared a Superfund cleanup site.

Much of Washington’s history has been told through the perspective of its colonizers, obscuring and mythologizing the changes to these lands that have long been occupied by Native peoples. Through the story of the river, author BJ Cummings explores previously unrecorded Native and immigrant histories, and exposes settler falsehoods about the founding of the state. The river’s story is a call to action to align future decisions with values of collaboration, respect, and justice.

BJ Cummings (she/her) founded the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition and manages community engagement for the University of Washington’s Superfund Research Program. She is the author of  The River That Made Seattle: A Natural and Human History of the Duwamish, and she was awarded the River Network’s national River Hero award for her work leading community-based clean up and restoration of the Duwamish River.

Cummings lives in Seattle.

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HYBRID: Washington State Poet Laureate Rena Priest Reading & Open Mic for Duvall Poetry https://www.humanities.org/event/hybrid-washington-state-poet-laureate-rena-priest-reading-open-mic-for-duvall-poetry/ Thu, 08 Dec 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://www.humanities.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=34766 Join Washington State Poet Laureate Rena Priest for a reading and open mic, sponsored by Duvall Poetry. This is a hybrid event. If you wish to join this event virtually, […]

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Join Washington State Poet Laureate Rena Priest for a reading and open mic, sponsored by Duvall Poetry. This is a hybrid event. If you wish to join this event virtually, click here to open the Zoom link.

Rena Priest is the current Washington State Poet Laureate. A member of the Lhaq’temish (Lummi) Nation, she is the author of Patriarchy Blues, which was honored with the 2018 American Book Award, and the recent Sublime Subliminal.

The Poet Laureate program is sponsored by Humanities Washington and The Washington State Arts Commission/ArtsWA, with the support of Governor Jay Inslee. See the full website of the Poet Laureate here.

Poet Laureate events are produced by the hosting organization.

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IN PERSON: How Audio Technology Changed the World https://www.humanities.org/event/in-person-how-audio-technology-changed-the-world-11/ Fri, 09 Dec 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://www.humanities.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=36060 Although we live in a visual world, audio still has the power to create intimacy and spark the imagination like no other medium can. Veteran broadcaster Ross Reynolds explores the […]

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Although we live in a visual world, audio still has the power to create intimacy and spark the imagination like no other medium can. Veteran broadcaster Ross Reynolds explores the impact that audio transmission has had on society and storytelling, beginning with the first century of radio up to the modern age of audiobooks, internet streaming, podcasts, and smart speakers. How has audio transmission changed society, and what makes it such a still powerful form of communication?

Attendees will be encouraged to share stories of their formative audio experiences, and local radio broadcasters and podcasters will be invited to share their stories.

Ross Reynolds (he/him) is an interviewer, moderator, and convener. He recently served as KUOW’s executive producer for community engagement, before which he was a program host for 16 years. His awards include the 2011 Public Radio News Directors First Place in the call-in category for Living in a White City. In 2015, he was named to the University of Washington Communication Alumni Hall of Fame.

Reynolds lives in Seattle.

Please note that this is an in-person event. As a precaution against the continued threat of COVID-19, the host site agrees to follow all local, state, and federal safety guidelines for public gatherings.

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IN PERSON: A Nicer Kind of Murder: The Evolution of Crime Fiction https://www.humanities.org/event/in-person-a-nicer-kind-of-murder-the-evolution-of-crime-fiction-8/ Sat, 10 Dec 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://www.humanities.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=36294 Murder isn’t what it used to be. Explore the shifting role of the victim in detective novels, and how that shift reflects broader social changes. From Poe and Sherlock Homes […]

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Murder isn’t what it used to be. Explore the shifting role of the victim in detective novels, and how that shift reflects broader social changes.

From Poe and Sherlock Homes to British cozies and Hardboiled pulps, novelist Matthew Sullivan traces the many influences on the postwar and modern eras of the mystery genre and shows how empathy plays a unique role in contemporary crime novels—especially in today’s literary mysteries.

What does the way crime victims are portrayed say about a society’s culture? Join Sullivan to reflect on the special relationship between reading literature and experiencing empathy—on the page and in our daily lives.

Matthew Sullivan (he/him) is the author of the novel Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore, which was an IndieNext pick, a Barnes & Noble Discover pick, and winner of the Colorado Book Award. His essays and stories have appeared in the New York Times, Daily Beast, Spokesman-Review, Sou’wester, and elsewhere. He is currently a writing teacher and is working on a crime novel set in Soap Lake.

Sullivan lives in Anacortes.

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IN PERSON: Diamonds in the Rough: The Gentrification of Rural Washington https://www.humanities.org/event/in-person-diamonds-in-the-rough-the-gentrification-of-rural-washington-10/ Tue, 13 Dec 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://www.humanities.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=36520 Washington’s rural communities are rapidly changing. Formerly reliant on working-class industries like mining, oil, and agriculture, an influx of wealthy urbanites is looking for a different kind of experience that […]

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Washington’s rural communities are rapidly changing. Formerly reliant on working-class industries like mining, oil, and agriculture, an influx of wealthy urbanites is looking for a different kind of experience that includes natural amenities, outdoor recreation, and cultural activities. But in doing so, these newcomers are causing new inequalities.

Join Jennifer Sherman, professor of sociology, to discuss both the glaring and the hidden effects of rural gentrification. Through the lens of a rural Washington community, Sherman explains how “class blindness” protects those with more privilege from fully recognizing social class inequalities. She advocates for the importance of getting to know the neighbors who are least like us so that we can minimize destructive social divides together.

Jennifer Sherman (she/her) is a professor of sociology at Washington State University. Her qualitative research focuses on poverty and inequality, mainly in the rural Northwest. She is the author of two books, the most recent of which is titled Dividing Paradise: Rural Inequality and the Diminishing American Dream (2021), and the coeditor of the 2017 volume, Rural Poverty in the United States.

Sherman lives in Moscow, Idaho.

This talk is presented in partnership with The Thomas S. Foley Institute for Public Policy and Public Service, which educates citizens across the state about democratic institutions and public affairs, and is based at Washington State University. For more information, visit The Foley Institute’s website.

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IN PERSON: Diamonds in the Rough: The Gentrification of Rural Washington https://www.humanities.org/event/in-person-diamonds-in-the-rough-the-gentrification-of-rural-washington-12/ Fri, 16 Dec 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://www.humanities.org/event/in-person-diamonds-in-the-rough-the-gentrification-of-rural-washington-12/ Washington’s rural communities are rapidly changing. Formerly reliant on working-class industries like mining, oil, and agriculture, an influx of wealthy urbanites is looking for a different kind of experience that […]

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Washington’s rural communities are rapidly changing. Formerly reliant on working-class industries like mining, oil, and agriculture, an influx of wealthy urbanites is looking for a different kind of experience that includes natural amenities, outdoor recreation, and cultural activities. But in doing so, these newcomers are causing new inequalities.

Join Jennifer Sherman, professor of sociology, to discuss both the glaring and the hidden effects of rural gentrification. Through the lens of a rural Washington community, Sherman explains how “class blindness” protects those with more privilege from fully recognizing social class inequalities. She advocates for the importance of getting to know the neighbors who are least like us so that we can minimize destructive social divides together.

Jennifer Sherman (she/her) is a professor of sociology at Washington State University. Her qualitative research focuses on poverty and inequality, mainly in the rural Northwest. She is the author of two books, the most recent of which is titled Dividing Paradise: Rural Inequality and the Diminishing American Dream (2021), and the coeditor of the 2017 volume, Rural Poverty in the United States.

Sherman lives in Moscow, Idaho.

This talk is presented in partnership with The Thomas S. Foley Institute for Public Policy and Public Service, which educates citizens across the state about democratic institutions and public affairs, and is based at Washington State University. For more information, visit The Foley Institute’s website.

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IN PERSON: Atomic Washington: Our Nuclear Past, Present, and Future https://www.humanities.org/event/in-person-atomic-washington-our-nuclear-past-present-and-future-2/ Fri, 16 Dec 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://www.humanities.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=36035 At the center of every nuclear weapon in the United States is a small pit of radioactive material manufactured at a top-secret facility in Eastern Washington, a facility which today […]

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At the center of every nuclear weapon in the United States is a small pit of radioactive material manufactured at a top-secret facility in Eastern Washington, a facility which today remains the most radiologically contaminated site in the Western hemisphere.

But Washington State’s role in the nuclear era ranges far beyond the construction, operation, and ongoing cleanup of the Hanford nuclear reservation. Today, Washington has two operating nuclear reactors, one of which provides us with ten percent of our electricity. Radioactive substances are used in our state to cure diseases, build airplanes, detect pollutants, and power smoke detectors. Further, Naval Base Kitsap has the largest stockpile of nuclear weapons deployed anywhere in the country.

Drawing from history, science, and popular culture, author Steve Olson reveals the many influences of nuclear materials on Washington State, and the many ways in which our state has been a pioneer in the atomic age.

Steve Olson (he/him) is a writer who most recently authored The Apocalypse Factory: Plutonium and the Making of the Atomic Age. His books have been nominated in several local and national book awards. Since 1979, he has been a consultant writer for the National Academy of Sciences, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, and other national scientific organizations.

Raised in Eastern Washington, Olson now lives in Seattle.

Please note that this is an in-person event. As a precaution against the continued threat of COVID-19, the host site agrees to follow all local, state, and federal safety guidelines for public gatherings.

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IN PERSON: How Audio Technology Changed the World https://www.humanities.org/event/in-person-how-audio-technology-changed-the-world-12/ Sat, 07 Jan 2023 22:00:00 +0000 https://www.humanities.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=36526 Although we live in a visual world, audio still has the power to create intimacy and spark the imagination like no other medium can. Veteran broadcaster Ross Reynolds explores the […]

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Although we live in a visual world, audio still has the power to create intimacy and spark the imagination like no other medium can. Veteran broadcaster Ross Reynolds explores the impact that audio transmission has had on society and storytelling, beginning with the first century of radio up to the modern age of audiobooks, internet streaming, podcasts, and smart speakers. How has audio transmission changed society, and what makes it such a still powerful form of communication?

Attendees will be encouraged to share stories of their formative audio experiences, and local radio broadcasters and podcasters will be invited to share their stories.

Ross Reynolds (he/him) is an interviewer, moderator, and convener. He recently served as KUOW’s executive producer for community engagement, before which he was a program host for 16 years. His awards include the 2011 Public Radio News Directors First Place in the call-in category for Living in a White City. In 2015, he was named to the University of Washington Communication Alumni Hall of Fame.

Reynolds lives in Seattle.

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IN PERSON: Will the 2020s Roar like the 1920s? https://www.humanities.org/event/in-person-will-the-2020s-roar-like-the-1920s-5/ Sat, 14 Jan 2023 21:00:00 +0000 https://www.humanities.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=36012 A pandemic, protests, and economic jolts ushered in the so-called “Roaring Twenties.” Americans adjusted in ways both innovative and counterproductive. What lessons from the 1920s can we apply to our […]

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A pandemic, protests, and economic jolts ushered in the so-called “Roaring Twenties.” Americans adjusted in ways both innovative and counterproductive. What lessons from the 1920s can we apply to our own looming 20s?

Historian William Woodward charts the eerily familiar developments of a century ago: shattered idealism, social clashes, domestic terrorism, culture wars, disorienting technologies, and fearsome disease. How might stories from a particular moment in the past—one with remarkable parallels to the present—shed light on ways for us to move forward? As the 2020s unfold, what conversations should we have?

William Woodward (he/him) is an award-winning professor of American and Pacific Northwest history at Seattle Pacific University. His teaching, research, and writing focus on iconic elements of regional and national culture, including the military and baseball. His co-authored pictorial history of the Washington National Guard was released in 2019. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Wheaton College, as well as a master’s degree and PhD from Georgetown University.

Woodward lives in Seattle.

Please note that this is an in-person event. As a precaution against the continued threat of COVID-19, the host site agrees to follow all local, state, and federal safety guidelines for public gatherings.

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IN PERSON: Diamonds in the Rough: The Gentrification of Rural Washington https://www.humanities.org/event/in-person-diamonds-in-the-rough-the-gentrification-of-rural-washington-8/ Sat, 14 Jan 2023 21:00:00 +0000 https://www.humanities.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=36401 Washington’s rural communities are rapidly changing. Formerly reliant on working-class industries like mining, oil, and agriculture, an influx of wealthy urbanites is looking for a different kind of experience that […]

The post IN PERSON: Diamonds in the Rough: The Gentrification of Rural Washington appeared first on Humanities Washington.

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Washington’s rural communities are rapidly changing. Formerly reliant on working-class industries like mining, oil, and agriculture, an influx of wealthy urbanites is looking for a different kind of experience that includes natural amenities, outdoor recreation, and cultural activities. But in doing so, these newcomers are causing new inequalities.

Join Jennifer Sherman, professor of sociology, to discuss both the glaring and the hidden effects of rural gentrification. Through the lens of a rural Washington community, Sherman explains how “class blindness” protects those with more privilege from fully recognizing social class inequalities. She advocates for the importance of getting to know the neighbors who are least like us so that we can minimize destructive social divides together.

Jennifer Sherman (she/her) is a professor of sociology at Washington State University. Her qualitative research focuses on poverty and inequality, mainly in the rural Northwest. She is the author of two books, the most recent of which is titled Dividing Paradise: Rural Inequality and the Diminishing American Dream (2021), and the coeditor of the 2017 volume, Rural Poverty in the United States.

Sherman lives in Moscow, Idaho.

This talk is presented in partnership with The Thomas S. Foley Institute for Public Policy and Public Service, which educates citizens across the state about democratic institutions and public affairs, and is based at Washington State University. For more information, visit The Foley Institute’s website.

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